Pishoha
Δ Back to Top
➜ http://www.youtube.com/attribution_link?a=zbKrLcRqJ4c&u=/watch?v=74mdJUaRNaA&feature=share

Fantastic

Orgasm 😍😍😍

Orgasm 😍😍😍

brotherkings:

Zane Holtz’s bio and photos from his profile on Model Mayhem

Height: 6’1”

Weight: 180 lbs

Chest: 40”

Waist: 31”

Experience: very experienced

richie + smirking

elirya:

Richie Gecko 1x04

➜ brainpickings.org
➜ http://www.youtube.com/attribution_link?a=bwMb9xCT6JM&u=/watch?v=T2p1LVtts_8&feature=share
➜ http://www.youtube.com/attribution_link?a=zN7n8P1R7qI&u=/watch?v=gO_KyTtJg10&feature=share

CRAZY

posthawk:

Her (2013)

(via kristinasays)

castorochiaro:

prokopetz:

nebcondist1:

prokopetz:

I’ve seen this image going around, and I feel compelled to point out that it’s only half-right. It’s true that high heels were originally a masculine fashion, but they weren’t originally worn by butchers - nor for any other utilitarian purpose, for that matter.
High heels were worn by men for exactly the same reason they’re worn by women today: to display one’s legs to best effect. Until quite recently, shapely, well-toned calves and thighs were regarded as an absolute prerequisite for male attractiveness. That’s why you see so many paintings of famous men framed to show off their legs - like this one of George Washington displaying his fantastic calves:

… or this one of Louis XIV of France rocking a fabulous pair of red platform heels (check out those thighs!):

… or even this one of Charles I of England showing off his high-heeled riding boots - note, again, the visual emphasis on his well-formed calves:

In summary: were high heels originally worn by men? Yes. Were they worn to keep blood off their feet? No at all - they were worn for the same reason they’re worn today: to look fabulous.

so then how did they become a solo feminine item of attire?

A variety of reasons. In France, for example, high heels fell out out of favour in the court of Napoleon due to their association with aristocratic decadence, while in England, the more conservative fashions of the Victorian era regarded it as indecent for a man to openly display his calves.
But then, fashions come and go. The real question is why heels never came back into fashion for men - and that can be laid squarely at the feet of institutionalised homophobia. Essentially, heels for men were never revived because, by the early 20th Century, sexually provocative attire for men had come to be associated with homosexuality; the resulting moral panic ushered in an era of drab, blocky, fully concealing menswear in which a well-turned calf simply had no place - a setback from which men’s fashion has yet to fully recover.

History associated with gender and how gender-associated behaviors and fashions have changed over time is just so FASCINATING. 

castorochiaro:

prokopetz:

nebcondist1:

prokopetz:

I’ve seen this image going around, and I feel compelled to point out that it’s only half-right. It’s true that high heels were originally a masculine fashion, but they weren’t originally worn by butchers - nor for any other utilitarian purpose, for that matter.

High heels were worn by men for exactly the same reason they’re worn by women today: to display one’s legs to best effect. Until quite recently, shapely, well-toned calves and thighs were regarded as an absolute prerequisite for male attractiveness. That’s why you see so many paintings of famous men framed to show off their legs - like this one of George Washington displaying his fantastic calves:

… or this one of Louis XIV of France rocking a fabulous pair of red platform heels (check out those thighs!):

… or even this one of Charles I of England showing off his high-heeled riding boots - note, again, the visual emphasis on his well-formed calves:

In summary: were high heels originally worn by men? Yes. Were they worn to keep blood off their feet? No at all - they were worn for the same reason they’re worn today: to look fabulous.

so then how did they become a solo feminine item of attire?

A variety of reasons. In France, for example, high heels fell out out of favour in the court of Napoleon due to their association with aristocratic decadence, while in England, the more conservative fashions of the Victorian era regarded it as indecent for a man to openly display his calves.

But then, fashions come and go. The real question is why heels never came back into fashion for men - and that can be laid squarely at the feet of institutionalised homophobia. Essentially, heels for men were never revived because, by the early 20th Century, sexually provocative attire for men had come to be associated with homosexuality; the resulting moral panic ushered in an era of drab, blocky, fully concealing menswear in which a well-turned calf simply had no place - a setback from which men’s fashion has yet to fully recover.

History associated with gender and how gender-associated behaviors and fashions have changed over time is just so FASCINATING. 

(via alittlebitgayandmore)

Today Audrey Kathleen Hepburn-Ruston would have turned 85. She passed away 21 years ago, on January 20, 1993 at 8pm, at the young age of 63 from a rare type of cancer. Soon after losing her we felt that, would she have had more time on this earth, she would have spent it continuing to speak on the behalf of the millions of children who don’t have a ‘fair start’ in life. This was the generation she worked for tirelessly for the last 5 years of her life as an ambassador for UNICEF. During her tenure (1988-1992) 45,000 of them died of preventable causes each day. Today the number is down to 21,000. She believed in education as a way to change the course of history in those countries that are still developing, which is why we created both the Audrey Hepburn Children’s Fund (www.audreyhepburn.com) and the Audrey Hepburn Society at the US Fund for UNICEF (www.unicefusa.org/AudreyHepburnSociety). Both dedicated to assisting in the survival and development of children in need all over the World of which over 100,000,000, 2/3 of whom are girls, still do not have access to a basic education.

While she is still remembered as a film actor, she also remains a symbol of both inner and outer elegance for many, her last chapter as a humanitarian forever intertwined with her Hollywood and style legacies. This truly brings home the concept that it is not what you wear but how you wear it – not what you say but how you say it - as she always used to say, “it’s not just the words but it’s also the ‘tune’ that counts”. “Put yourself in the other person shoes” was also one of her motos. This is how she reached the inner core of the roles she played and probably what also made her humanitarian missions so unbearably vivid. She could feel their pain.

What is extraordinary about this last chapter of her life is that she truly was a ‘sprite’ – youthful at heart and fun to the core - which is probably why she has successfully communicated with our youth. Today they represent more than half of her fan base. And it is this same generation that wishes to find a way to be an active player in ‘changing the World.’ In time, they will cause the way we look at business – at profit – to change. Rather than having separate ‘for profit’ and ‘nonprofit’ activities, they will cause the two to merge into one, thus giving the possibility for all to do what they love while doing something that enhances society as a whole.

Thank you to all of you who have kept her ‘story’ alive. In the end this is who & what she was… a great story teller. Whether on the silver screen or on a UNICEF podium fighting for the survival of millions or wearing the iconic ‘little back dress’ or smiling at you from a poster on your cupboard door… her story of feelings and emotions, style and grace, elegance and compassion lives on thanks to your affection.

— Sean Hepburn Ferrer (via audreykathleenhepburn)